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Old 16 Aug 2017, 01:57 PM   #16
soromak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ioneja View Post

In my experience, once you get above about 10MB, the immediacy and convenience of email starts hitting obstacles, with increasingly diminishing returns as you increase attachment size. Once you go above 25MB, you lose Gmail and other major providers... and once you pass 50MB you've lost most of the big players. Once you go over 100MB you are just chewing up bandwidth and file storage like crazy, and it doesn't make much sense. At least not when even Dropbox can handle files that are theoretically unlimited, up to the capacity of your storage.

Just my two bits.
Gmail has increased message size limit for inbound to 50MB (outbound of larger attachments is done by Google Drive) and Office 365 increased it to 150MB based on the feedback from users.And I can see an increased trend of businesses moving to MS Cloud. So definitely there is a demand for larger attachment size from average user base. Just adding more and more services for sharing large files is more complicated for an average user sending large Powerpoint file and with a need to create more accounts at different file sharing platforms and so on poses a security risk and requires additional costs.
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Old 16 Aug 2017, 04:45 PM   #17
janusz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ioneja View Post
For a bunch of reasons, but here are two big ones, for starters:
Thank you, ioneja, for your detailed explanation.

The underlying (and unstated explicitly) background to my question was something like: is there a technical specification which puts a strict limit on the message size? (something like 'the length in bytes has to fit into a 32-bit integer'). I could not recall such a rule, but I'm far from claiming I know every verse of every relevant RFC

Your arguments, ioneja, are not of technical nature, they are based on your idea of best working practices, including "don't be a hog". I agree with some, but not all, of them. As they are a matter of opinion, I see no point in arguing about them in public.

Thank you again for presenting your point of view.
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Old 16 Aug 2017, 06:30 PM   #18
janusz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soromak View Post
Gmail has increased message size limit for inbound to 50MB [...]And I can see an increased trend of businesses moving to MS Cloud
This means all file-exchanging parties have to have an account with either Gmail or MS Cloud.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soromak View Post
with a need to create more accounts at different file sharing platforms and so on poses a security risk and requires additional costs.
Why there is a need to create more accounts at different platforms? Why one isn't sufficient?

BTW, one can download a file from Dropbox without opening a Dropbox account. I bet this goes for most, if not all, file sharing services.
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Old 17 Aug 2017, 02:35 AM   #19
ioneja
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Originally Posted by janusz View Post
Your arguments, ioneja, are not of technical nature, they are based on your idea of best working practices, including "don't be a hog".
Yep, my POV is entirely based on best working practices and the reality of working with super large files with lots of clients and projects over the years. I've probably tried every service out there, and every single one has issues. And yes, "don't be a hog" - lol. As for a technical reason why email wouldn't work, I can't give one.

And I agree with those that find this whole thing frustrating at times. I don't know how many times I've had to step a client through the process of sending me large files, and there is no magic bullet. So I tend to just use all the major services and whichever one my client gravitates to, is the one our particular relationship defaults to. It's occasionally messy.

Going back to best practices and trying to be relevant to the OP, my main point is to choose a file sharing platform that the whole party/group can agree upon, and try to stick with it... and that email itself is not going to cut it in the current practical world we live in, when dealing with really large files. So might as well just get on with it, and pick a system and then support each other to make use of those tools. Get the job done, right?

Ideally, there would be one universal protocol that is widely understood, implemented and accepted, with no additional accounts or tools, that could do it all seamlessly, but we're not there yet.
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Old 17 Aug 2017, 06:21 PM   #20
ewal
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For large folders/files, 2-way collaboration, auditing etc I use Filezilla Server.

Small investment of time upfront and minimal effort thereafter.

Of course you need an always-on machine and sufficient upload bandwidth.

send.firefox.com looks great for quick one-off needs.
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